Low effective wood processing (2005), continuation

Events, facts, documents and evidences: It has been described before that timber processing was inefficiently managed in the National Park. In 1992 - 1993 the basic powers of the National Park were directed to extract as much wood affected by Bark beetle as possible. The scales and volumes of fellings were very large, but the capacity to take wood out of the forest of Belovezhskaya Pushcha was by far too small. As a result huge volumes of wood were lying scattered throughout Belovezhskaya Pushcha. The wood remained to lie on the ground for months and even years. While it was slowly rotting its high technical value decreased. The timber processing plant was also full of wood being impossible to process all logs delivered. This lead to a further decrease in the economic value of the harvested wood. Sales of planks and other wood products were poorly organized as well. Since the "raw" timber was lying very long before it was being processed much of the sawn timber turned out black, to the detriment of its commercial value.

In 2004 the situation concerning the timber processing plant has not changed for the better.

Just the single photo below, made in late autumn 2004, is sufficient to illustrate a characteristic situation on the territory of the timber processing plant.

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(Wood dumping on
the northern side of the
timber processing plant;
November 11, 2004)

In the end of 2005 one more inspection of the territory of the timber processing plant has been carried out. The assessment proved that the year did not bring any qualitative positive changes. The volume of rotten wood and trees of poor quality had decreased. Still numerous stacks of half-rotten logs, that had lost their good technical value quality, were lying in chaotic groups nearly all over the area of the timber processing plant.

These pictures show a view on the southern side of the timber processing plant in 2005, exactly three years after the first inspection. Still half-rotten wood is lying there, as three years ago. The volumes have decreased slightly. However, the "ugly" view of territory remains the same.

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(Wood dumping on the southern side of the timber processing plant; December 16, 2005)

These pictures show large stacks of darkened wood which have been lying for a rather long period.

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(Large stacks of darkened wood on the southern side of the timber
processing plant; December 16, 2005)

This is more darkened wood.

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(Darkened wood on the southern side of the timber processing plant;
December 16, 2005)

A great number of black boards lying in rain and snow for a long time are shown there.

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(Darkened boards on the southern side of the timber processing plant; December 16, 2005)

This is a general view of basic store ground of lumber, with both recently sawn material as well as planks that have been stored for a rather long time.

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(Darkened logs on the southern side of the timber processing plant;
December 16, 2005)

On the northern side of the timber processing plant rotten wood has completely been cleared.

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(Wood on the northern side of the timber processing plant;
December 16, 2005)

A view on the central entrance of the timber processing plant: a checking post and a metal gate made in 2005. It hides the non-aesthetic view of the territory of the timber processing plant to some extent.

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(December 16, 2005)

See more detailed information about the problem of low effective timber processing on these older pages:


Further: Wood export (2005), continuation