Rotten timber wood left to lie in the forest (2004), continuation

Infringements: Clauses 25, 26 and 27 of the Law of the Republic of Belarus «About Special Protected Natural Territories and Objects» are violated; violation of the ecological balance within the protected forest; infliction of damage to biological diversity; economic losses resulting from deterioration of the quality of the timber.

Events, facts, documents and evidences: As was shown in earlier pages ("Tens of thousands cubic meters wood left behind in the forest rot away (May 2001 - January 2003)" and "Hundred thousand cubic meters of wood rotting on the forests' ground, 2003") the adopted technology to realize fellings in "Belovezhskaya Pushcha" National Park are far from the perfect. After stands of Spruce were affected in Belovezhskaya Pushcha by Spruce Bark beetle in 2001 and 2002 major powers directed to cut down the infected trees and to harvest as much timber as possible. The due transport of the raw wood out of the forest was not paid proper attention. It resulted in the presence of a huge volume of timber, amounting to 100,000 cubic meters in 2003, stored in the forest. It became an actual problem for the National Park as the wood was rotting in the forest. The wood lost much of its high technical values. This resulted without any doubt in considerable economic losses to the National Park.

In autumn 2003 the Park was helped with prompt removal of the huge volume of wood that had been accumulating in the forest (see "Offer help to remove timber ", news on September 11, 2003).

However, only major storages and stacks of grouped wood, which laid everywhere like mountains, were removed out the forest. Many small groups remained to lay and to rot within the forest. Actually the entire territory of Belovezhskaya Pushcha is an area where single logs and little groups of wood are lying and rotting. These raw materials proved to be unnecessary for further use in the industry of the National Park. Nonetheless considerable financial means have been spent to cut the logs concerned. This proves once again that the current administration of the National Park is poorly organized and that its efficiency is low. Instead of proper organizing jobs in the forest, instead of reducing large-scale cuttings to a minimum and instead of enhancing the efficiency and the profitability of the business of the National Park, it obstinately continues to follow an old deadlock, which is to provide an inefficient and harmful policy of large-scale timber harvesting within the protected area, although this kind of activity brings essential damage to the unique relic woods of Belovezhskaya Pushcha as well as unreasonable economic losses.

As is shown on these pictures, trunks of Spruce trees have not been removed after they were cut down. Their felling was a consequence of a program to fight the struggle with Bark beetle. Such trees are lying in the whole area of Belovezhskaya Pushcha. However, the trees shown here were especially grouped in stacks in proper time in order to have them removed out of the forest.

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(None removed Spruce wood, compartment 827, October 06, 2004)
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(None removed Spruce wood:
1 - compartment 773, October 25, 2004;
2 - compartment 773, September 09, 2004)

Many Spruces have not even been grouped at all. As is shown here, they have been left to lay at felling sites.

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(None removed Spruce wood, compartment 773, September, 20 2004)
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(None removed Spruce wood: 1 - compartment 773, October 27, 2004;
2 - compartment 801, September 14, 2004;
3 - compartment 801, September 09, 2004)

Not only Spruce but also valuable wood of Pine, of high technical quality, remains to be lying all over the area of Belovezhskaya Pushcha. However, many logs were huge Pine trees aged 100 to 150 years before they were cut down.

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(None removed Pine wood, compartment 773, September 09, 2004)
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(None removed Pine wood: 1 and 2 - compartment 827, October 06, 2004;
3 - compartment 773, October 25, 2004)

On some locations logs of Aspen aged 100 years can be found.

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(None removed Aspen wood,
compartment 773,
September 09, 2004)

Oak wood was left somewhere. This tree has a high market price; wasting its wood once it has been cut is an utterly ugly practice.

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(None removed Oak wood, compartment 741, September 14, 2004)
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(None removed Oak wood,
compartment 828,
October 07, 2004)

In some cases when a forest fire occurred, bonfires were not controlling while wood remnants were being burned. As a result not only the forest but also the harvested wood became subject of such fires. These pictures demonstrate timber which has been burned down.

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(The burned down timber, compartment 773, September 09, 2004)

When wood is being left for rotting it takes a period of many years to let the most valuable wood of Belovezhskaya Pushcha be turned into humus. Nearly completely rotten wood of Pine, extracted from and left in the forest a few decades ago, is being shown on this picture.

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(The rotten wood,
compartment 826,
October 07, 2004)

Further: Low effective wood processing (2004), continuation